Creating Autonomous Drones to Protect Assets and Infrastructure

+ more

Both pilots and companies are navigating a thin line between security and innovation. Host Grant Guillot talks with leaders, influencers, and experts across the drone industry to guide us through the complex web of technology and policy in the United States.

 

The UAS industry requires cooperation and collaboration with lots of stakeholders. The FAA, however, isn’t the foe of commercialization. Talking about regulations and the evolution of the drone sector, Drones in America host Grant Guillot welcome Timothy Tenne, COO of Easy Aerial, a developer of autonomous drone systems. Tenne has an impressive career history, including service in the U.S. Air Force, FAA director, and roles in the rail industry in Washington D.C. and Amtrak.

Tenne is also a recent law school graduate telling Guillot he wanted to have experience with every angle of aviation—legal, pilot/operator, and engineering. He discussed his time at the FAA and the drone registration rule.

“Easy Aerial has a versatile system with many payload options, and it’s autonomous, and that’s key for the industry. The imperfect piece of the system is human, so building automation that’s smart and a person oversees makes it better” – Timothy Tenne

“The White House wanted it complete in eleven weeks, and we had it completed within eight. It was a special experience to work on a team that came together when the FAA didn’t even have a UAS division. It was also the beginning of the framework for Part 107,” he said.

The drone industry has evolved dramatically, with new players in the space positioning themselves as technology companies. Tenne considers that a misalignment. “A drone is an aircraft, and we should treat it as such. These are aerospace businesses that have to work in regulatory channels, and the FAA should be in the conversation early and often,” he added.

Tenne made it clear the FAA is there to support and work with industry players, something unique than other transportation bodies. What he learned in the aviation industry, he applied to the rail sector. Aviation is his passion, and that brought him to Easy Aerial.

“Easy Aerial has a versatile system with many payload options, and it’s autonomous, and that’s key for the industry. The imperfect piece of the system is human, so building automation that’s smart and a person oversees makes it better,” Tenne shared.

See Previous Episodes of Drones In America Here

Follow us on social media for the latest updates in B2B!

Twitter – @MarketScale
Facebook – facebook.com/marketscale
LinkedIn – linkedin.com/company/marketscale

Latest

Joe Oliveri Joins CTSI as CEO, Ruta Moves to Chairman
May 18, 2021
CHANTILLY, Va., May 18, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Corbett Technology Solutions, Inc. (CTSI) is pleased to announce the addition of Joe Oliveri, where he will assume the role of President and CEO. Gino Ruta, formerly CEO, Read more
Is It Time To Rebrand WBCT As 3D X-Ray?
May 18, 2021
When it comes to diagnostic imaging, 3D imaging provides an all-encompassing view of the body. For weight-bearing body parts, a 3D look can allow doctors to get an image, make a more accurate Read more
How Are Energy Projects Scaling Up as Renewables Get Cheaper?
May 18, 2021
Energy Innovation recently released a report confirming something some have begun to suspect – fossil fuels could be sunsetting faster than anticipated. The report found that initial conclusions that proposed 75% Read more